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Week 1

Mother

First, a note about timing: Your pregnancy is dated from the first day of your last menstrual period. So, for the purpose of the calculation made by your healthcare professional, you are considered pregnant about 2 weeks before you actually conceived.  During week 1, your normal menstrual period occurs. Your body sheds the lining of the uterus and prepares to make a new one that will host your baby.

Week 2

Mother

During this week, your body prepares to ovulate. About 20 of your eggs will develop inside fluid-filled sacs known as follicles. Usually, only one of the follicles will develop to the point where it ruptures, allowing the egg to travel down the fallopian tube to meet the sperm. Once an egg is released from an ovary, it must be fertilised by a sperm within 12 to 24 hours for conception to occur. (If one fertilised egg splits or if multiple eggs are fertlised, you could have twins, triplets, or more!)

Week 3

Mother

Conception—the meeting of sperm and egg—takes place this week, usually between days 14 and 17 of a 28-day menstrual cycle. Around week 3, the united egg and sperm will reach your uterus.  With no noticeable physical changes at this point, you probably won’t yet be aware that you have conceived.

Baby

The fertilized egg, called an embryo, beginning to grow inside you is tiny—about 1/5 the size of a full stop. By the time it reaches your uterus, it is a little ball of cells.

Week 4

Mother

The missed period that you were expecting at the end of this week will probably be the first major clue that you are pregnant. However, you may notice a little “spotting” or light bleeding when the embryo implants in your uterine lining this week. Tingling, tender, or swollen breasts may be another early sign that you are pregnant.

Baby

Baby’s cells begin to multiply, and placental tissue grows. At this point, though, the cluster of cells is microscopically small—no bigger than a poppy seed. Nevertheless, 3 different germ cell layers are developing. The ectoderm (outer layer) will produce your baby’s nervous system, skin, and hair. The endoderm (inner layer) will become the epithelial lining of the gastrointestinal tract, liver and pancreas. The mesoderm  (middle layer) will develop into the skeleton, connective tissues, blood system, urogenital system, and muscles.

Week 5

Mother

Your breasts will begin to enlarge and may become tender. You may need to urinate more often than usual because of your expanding uterus. It is also common to feel noticeably more tired than usual—after all, your body is working hard to create a new human being!

Baby

This week, the embryo’s shape changes from a ball to more of a tadpole. The baby’s spinal cord, brain, arms, legs, liver and kidneys are starting to form.  

Week 6

Mother

Nausea and vomiting — commonly known as morning sickness may start now. About 75% of pregnant women suffer from morning sickness, which may actually occur at any time during the day. At this time you may not notice much change externally. If you have had morning sickness and have not been eating as much as usual, you may have lost weight.

Baby

Your baby now measures about 5 mm in length. Baby’s head is as large as the rest of their body, but their arm and leg buds are starting to lengthen. The facial features are forming and their heart is beating at approximately 150 beats per minute.

Week 7

Mother

Although you may be starting to feel pregnant, most people still won’t be aware that you are unless you tell them. You may also notice that you are more emotional these days—the many hormones circulating through your body, make mood swings almost inevitable.

Baby

Your baby is growing quickly. Their brain is forming about 100 cells  per minute. Their leg buds are now shaped like short paddles and their kidneys are at a stage where they are ready to start waste management. 

Week 8

Mother

Your pregnancy is slowly changing your figure. You may notice your waistline expanding and soon have to make changes to your wardrobe.

Baby

By now your baby measures about 1 cm in length. Despite this small size, their central nervous system and major organs are beginning to function. Their features are starting to take shape and they are now starting to look like a miniature human being.

Week 9

Mother

You may experience a roller coaster of emotions at this time. This is largely due to hormonal changes taking place in your body. Around this time you may also notice that you are more prone to gas, heartburn, and constipation. You can thank your hormones for these normal, if somewhat unpleasant, changes.

Baby

Your baby now called a fetus is about 2.5 cm in length. Their arms are longer and bend at the elbows. Their fingers and toes are also now better defined. Bones and muscles are starting to form and work together. Even though gender cannot be identified by ultrasound yet, your baby’s genitals have begun to form.

Week 10

Mother

Even though your clothes may not be fitting as well, you probably don’t need maternity clothes just yet. Every pregnancy belly is different, some show as early as the first trimester, others stay flat well into the second trimester. If you are slender to start with or had a baby before, you may show early. Hormones may also affect your interest in sexual activity either an increased or a diminished interest is perfectly normal.

Baby

Your baby now is about 3 cm in length and weighs about 4 g. The head is now more proportional to their body. The lungs, liver, kidneys, brains and intestines are formed and functional.

Week 11

Mother

Your uterus has now risen above your pelvis and is a little bigger than a grapefruit. During an external examination, your healthcare professional may be able to feel it.

Baby

Your baby now weighs about 9 g. Although they are tiny, their organs are in the final stages of developing their shapes and functions. Nail beds are starting to form on individual fingers and toes, and tiny hair follicles are starting to appear. Tooth buds are forming, and the tiny heart is developing further.

Week 12

Mother

You may notice weight gain in your abdomen and breasts with your clothes feeling tighter. You are probably starting to feel the best you have felt since becoming pregnant. At about this time, morning sickness may start to diminish for a lot of women. The risk of miscarriage has by now declined considerably, so you may be ready to share your good news with the world.

Baby

Your baby’s length is now approximately 5.5 cm. All of the major organ systems have finished forming—now they just need to mature. Around this time, it may be possible to hear your baby’s heartbeat with your doctor’s fetal doppler, a special listening device. They can roll around, stretch and even yawn.

Week 13

Mother

By now, your regular clothing feels snug—and it’s time for the transition to looser garments! Your breasts have increased in size and weight. Your nipples may be larger and more sensitive, and the areola, which surrounds the nipple, is also growing larger and darker.

Baby

Your baby now weighs about 23 g and about 7-8 cm in length. Your baby’s face begins to look more human, with the eyes now closer together and the ears on the side of the head. Baby’s unique fingerprints are already in place and his vocal cords will start to develop.

Week 14

Mother

As your uterus expands to make room for your baby, the placenta, and increased amniotic fluid, you will start to notice a definite tummy bulge. Now or soon you will need new clothing to fit your growing waist. You may be more prone to heartburn these days. Some women develop hemorrhoids around this stage of pregnancy.

Baby

Your baby is now about the size of your fist and weighs about 43 g. Their neck is longer, and the head now sits up from the chest. They are covered in lanugo, a fine downy hair that keeps them warm during the next several weeks. They are also growing hair on their head along with eyebrows. They can now grasp, frown and may even suck their thumb.

Week 15

Mother

Your pregnancy may now be evident to others if you wear form-fitting clothing or maternity clothes. However, this varies from woman to woman and depends on your own body shape and build. With your circulatory system moving more blood than usual through your veins and arteries, you may develop varicose veins—blueish veins that are a bit swollen and can cause discomfort. Don’t be surprised if you notice increased vaginal discharge as long as it is white and watery-looking, the discharge is normal.

Baby

Your baby now weighs about 85 g and is about the size of a naval orange. Their legs are growing longer than their arms and all joints and limbs can move. The fingernails are also fully formed. If the external genitals are developed enough, the gender of your baby can be determined.

Week 16

Mother

Around this time, you will start to notice that the symptoms that you had early in the pregnancy are starting to ease up. You might find that your energy level is picking up. It’s also normal to feel some apprehension about what lies ahead as motherhood approaches.

Baby

Your baby is now about 11.6 cm long and weighs about 100 g. All of baby’s muscles are in place and getting stronger. Eyebrows and eyelashes have appeared and the eyes are able to perceive some light.

Week 17

Mother

By now, anyone who gives you a hug will feel the swelling in your lower abdomen. During the second trimester, most women gain between 5 to 6 kg. This week you may have one of the most exciting experiences of your pregnancy—feeling the baby move for the first time. Many women describe the feeling as “fluttering.” These movements also known as quickening typically begins sometime between 16 and 20 weeks.

Baby

Your baby is now about the size of your open hand and weighs about 140 g. Their sucking and swallowing reflex continues to develop. During this week and the weeks that follow, your baby will start to accumulate fat.

Week 18

Mother

Around this time, you might start to experience a bit of back pain. It is common for pregnant women to have it in later pregnancy. Several factors contribute to backache, including your increased weight, a shifting center of gravity as your uterus grows. During pregnancy the joints of your pelvis expand for delivery of your baby and your growig abdomen throws your body off balance.

Baby

Your baby now weighs about 190 g. A mid-pregnancy ultrasound scan is often done sometime in the second trimester to assess growth and development. During this scan you might see your baby kick, flex, roll or even suck their thumb.

Week 19

Mother

At this point, you may feel your baby moving and kicking. At times these movements are so active that they keep you awake. Some days you might even feel the baby’s hiccups.

Baby

Although your baby weighs about 240 g now,  they will weigh around 13 times as much by the time he is born! They are about 15 cm long. This week sensory development is taking place as each of the senses are developing in their specific areas of the brain.

Week 20

Mother

By now you are probably feeling the many turns and twists of your baby as she makes your uterus into her own personal “exercise” room. Her growth is also causing your abdominal muscles to stretch and be pushed apart. You may also feel a dull ache in your abdomen as your “round ligaments” stretch. It’s also not unusual to feel light-headed when you move quickly from a sitting to standing position

Baby

At the midpoint of your pregnancy, baby weighs about 280 g and measures about 16.5 cm. Their developing skin will start to be covered by vernix, a pasty white substance that helps hold in moisture and protect them from the amniotic fluid.

Week 21

Mother

You can’t hide it any more—even strangers can tell that you are expecting! You may sometimes suffer from swollen hands, ankles, or feet and occasionally the face. You may also notice that your nipples are secreting a thin, yellowish liquid—known as colostrum.

Baby

Your baby now weighs about 360 g and is approximately 27 cm long. They are swallowing amniotic fluid each day and their digestive system is starting to function at a basic level. With their developing senses, they are more aware of your voice, as well as noise levels in your surroundings.

Week 22

Mother

Although you definitely have a sizable pregnancy “bump”. You’re probably feeling fine, though maybe a little more absentminded than usual. Some minor discomforts may include heartburns, sensitive gums that bleed when you brush and leg cramps.

Baby

Your baby now weighs about 430 g, and their body is getting larger every day. They now have well-developed lips and their hands are starting to grip. And since their taste buds are now developed, they can experience the flavours that cross through the placenta and the amniotic fluid they are swallowing.

Week 23

Mother

At this point, your size and your baby’s size are steadily progressing. Your health care professional will continue monitoring you to make sure this is so. You may feel more pushes against your belly as your baby starts moving more. Don’t be surprised if you experience clumsiness or are a little more forgetful—it’s all normal.

Baby

By this week your baby has reached over 500 g and measures about 29 cm in length. Although they are heavier than previous week, their skin is still saggy in appearance. Their hearing is established and they can hear your heartbeat and voice. Their lungs are also forming, in preparation for breathing.

Week 24

Mother

As baby’s arrival draws closer, it’s common to experience both anxiety and excitement about the future. Other changes you might notice around this time include pigment changes in your skin. Stretchmarks may appear across your abdomen, hips and breasts.

Baby

Your baby now weighs about 600 g, but they still have a lot of growing to do. Their face is almost fully formed and complete with a full set of eyelashes and eyebrows. They have actually developed enough to have a chance of surviving outside your body with intensive care if it is necessary to deliver prematurely.

Week 25

Mother

A glance at your side view in the mirror reveals that your uterus has grown quite a bit in a few weeks. Your uterus is now about the size of a basketball. Your breasts have also grown substantially. What new symptoms might you be noticing? Leg cramps are common at night in the second trimester. Or perhaps you’re feeling a bit itchy—the natural result of your skin stretching.

Baby

Baby now weighs about 660 g as they continues to grow. Their lungs are not quite ready for full function yet and need some more time to develop. They are making breathing movements but no air is filling their lungs yet.

Week 26

Mother

Since your baby is now almost 36 cm long, you’re more likely to feel the full effect of their kicks. With your uterus and baby growing larger, you are now more prone to backaches, mild swelling in your ankles, and leg cramps. You might also experience “Braxton Hicks” contractions— tightening of the muscles of your uterus that occur irregularly as your body practices for labor.

Baby

Your baby continues to fill out, now weighing about 760 g. They will really be piling on the grams in the weeks to come. They are able to inhale and exhale and their eyes are starting to open and close.

Week 27

Mother

As your baby is growing quickly in this phase, ensure you maintain a nutritious diet. As you near the end of the second trimester, it’s common to feel somewhat stressed or restless—your body has been undergoing a major construction project, and you know that you still have one stage to go. Relax, and take it easy.

Baby

This week, your baby will likely be about 875 g as their skin changes from being transparent to opaque. You will notice that your baby now has a regular sleeping and waking cycle.

Week 28

Mother

By now, you might have gained about 5 kg during this trimester. You may have also noticed a change in the quantity of food that you consume. At your antenatal check, your doctor or midwife will feel your abdomen – your uterus will now be well above your navel.

Baby

In the past 4 weeks, your baby has doubled their weight, to about 1 kg. They are working on forming their fat layers and their fingernails are now formed.

Week 29

Mother

The extra weight you’re carrying and the expected interruptions in your sleep are probably starting to make you feel a bit more tired. You’re also less nimble—and that’s not surprising, because your center of gravity has changed and you probably can’t even see the tips of your toes when standing upright. Slow down a little now—things will be quite busy soon enough!

Baby

Your baby now weighs a little over 1 kg and measures almost 38 cm in length. Their fat stores under their skin contributes to that weight. Your baby can hear well now and reacts to sounds from outside your womb.

Week 30

Mother

You may already feel quite large, even though you still have about 10 weeks to go before delivery. The average healthy gain during pregnancy is about 13.5 kg. The uterus, baby, placenta, and amniotic fluid will account for about ½ of your weight gain. The other ½ goes to your breasts, body fluids, blood, and maternal nutrient stores.

Baby

Baby now weighs almost 1.4 kg. The volume of amniotic fluid will decrease as they grow and gain weight rapidly during the next few weeks. Their brain continues to grow and make connections between its cells over the next several weeks.

Week 31

Mother

At this stage, your uterus is approximately 28 cm from the top of your pubic bone and fill a large part of your abdomen. You may start to feel breathless at times because the baby is pushing up against your lungs.

Baby

Your baby now weighs around 1.5 kg and measures about 41 cm in length. They are able to perceive signals from all 5 senses. Your baby’s organs are still maturing and they are starting to pass water from their bladder.

Week 32

Mother

One of the most common symptoms around this time is swelling in your ankles and feet due to the increase in body fluids. You may find that the swelling disappears overnight or after several hours of lying down.

Baby

Your baby now weighs about 1.7 kg and is about 42 cm long. They are probably spending most of their time asleep. Their lungs will continue to mature over the next few weeks. During this time they are inhaling amniotic fluid to exercise their lungs and practice their breathing.

Week 33

Mother

Your amniotic fluid levels are peaking right about now. Pregnant women can carry the fetus in a number of ways—high, low, wider, smaller, more compact, etc. All of these contours are normal they depend on your baby’s size and position as well as your own height and build.

Baby

This week your baby weighs about 2 kg. Their length is now about 44 cm. Their skull has not completely formed, however the bones in the other parts of the body are hardening.

Week 34

Mother

Sometime in the next few weeks, you may notice that your belly is a bit lower. This phenomenon, known as “dropping” or “lightening”, occurs when the head of the baby enters the pelvic cavity. You may enjoy the extra room in your upper abdomen, but notice a little more pressure in your pelvis and bladder.

Baby

Your baby now weighs about 2.2 kg and measures over 45 cm in length. They are nearly out of room in your uterus and you’ll notice a change in the way they bump against you. With no space for more amniotic fluid to cushion your baby’s movements, you may feel discomfort from their kicks and blows. This is a good time to start talking to your baby as in the next week or so their hearing will be fully developed.

Week 35

Mother

By now you may have gained between 11 to 13 kg. Your health care professional should be able to tell by now how your baby is positioned—upside down, with his head ready to come out first. This is also a time when your emotions seem to get the best of you—which is perfectly normal as you approach delivery. The pressure on your bladder may make you run to the bathroom more often than usual.

Baby

Your baby now weighs about 2.4 kg and is 45 cm in length, making it a little bit of a squeeze for them to fit in your body along with your other organs. Their brain is developing at a rapid pace but their skull is still soft allowing for the squeeze through the birth canal. This week your little one should also have a fully developed pair of kidneys.

Week 36

Mother

Good news! By the end of this week, your pregnancy will be full-term. Your baby’s head may begin to ease and nestle into your pelvis ready for birth. You will find breathing is easier once baby’s head is engaged as pressure is no longer against your lungs.

Baby

Your baby now weighs about 2.7 kg and measures 45 cm in length. Their digestive system is functioning. During these final weeks in your womb, they will spend a fair amount of time practicing their sucking reflex on their thumbs.

Week 37

Mother

You may have noticed a yellowish fluid coming out of your nipples recently. Your breasts are making a “test batch” of colostrum—the first breast milk that your body will produce for your newborn. At this week’s checkup, your doctor may perform a pelvic exam to determine the extent to which your body has prepared for labor. The exam will check for effacement (how much your cervix has softened and thinned in preparation for labor) and dilation (how much the cervix is open). In addition your doctor will check what position your baby is in and how far down the birth canal he has descended. This exam will serve as a benchmark in the coming weeks so that your doctor can monitor your progress.

Baby

Your baby is now considered full term. They are close to 2.8 kg and measures about 50 cm in length. Although ready for life outside the womb your baby is still growing and gaining about 500 g each week. They are preparing to make their exit from the womb—and if they are like most babies, their head is now pointed down into your pelvis.

Week 38

Mother

You are probably more uncomfortable this week than you were last week. You and your partner may be amused to detect—sometimes through the movement of your clothing—the squirming that is occurring in your crowded womb right now. You may have some symptoms that are less enjoyable, such as headaches or heartburn. Talk to your doctor if they are really troublesome, but otherwise take comfort in the fact that the finish line is in sight.

Baby

Your baby has gained a little weight this past week and now weighs about 3.1 kg, and about 51 cm in length. Their organ systems are fully developed and in place but their lungs will be the last to reach maturity. Even as they meet the outside world, they will take some time to establish a breathing pattern.

Week 39

Mother

You probably won’t get much bigger now as your baby’s growth slows down. Your cervix is softening in preparation for labour and it won’t be long before you deliver. Many women spend these last days of pregnancy organizing and cleaning around the house. Your desire to “nest” is brought to you courtesy of the hormones and emotions coursing through your very pregnant body.

Baby

Your baby now weighs about 3.4 kg and has reached a length of about 51 cm. The healthy weight range for newborns is between 2.5 and 3.8 kg. With all of his facial features developed, they are a cutie! All of their organ systems are developed and ready to go. Now they just need to decide when his birthday will be!

Week 40

Mother

Your body looks and undoubtedly feels large, but your labour may begin one or two weeks either side of your due date. Your mind may naturally turn to thinking about possible ways to hasten the process. Patience may be the best counsel right now.

Baby

This week your baby weighs about 3.5 kg. At this size, they fill your uterus and is out of room for movement. The outer layer of their skin and vernix (fatty cells) covering are beginning to shed. They recognize your voice—and it won’t be long before you hear theirs.

Week 41

Mother

If you are reading this milestone, you’re probably at least a little unhappy. Most expectant mothers aren’t pleased when the baby is overdue. Keep in mind that maybe your baby isn’t off schedule—after all, a due date is just an estimate. Only 2% of women are truly over their due dates. Your healthcare professional will monitor you closely.

Baby

Since your baby has no idea which day it is, they are just as content as they were last week in your womb! Further, since studies show that about 70% of apparent “post-term” pregnancies are really not post-term (they are instead the result of a miscalculation of the due date), chances are that their development is right on schedule.

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