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Toddler Toys

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Toddler Toys

Toys can help your toddler learn and explore the world around them. These don’t need to be elaborate or complex. Often, everyday items around the house can bring them much enjoyment, e.g. an open top empty box or the laundry basket.

There are, however, a few things to keep in mind when choosing toys for them to play with, such as;

  • Safety – carefully read the label and instructions. Pick toys which meet Australian standards and look for possible dangers such as small parts, which could break off easily, and long strings, that can become a choking hazard
  • Appearance and functionality – consider what it is about certain toys that appeals to your toddler such as colour, texture, sound or movement. Also think whether they’ll be able to play with it on their own or if they’ll need your help
  • Variety – decide if your little one needs the toy or is it already similar to something else they have. Will it be something they’ll play with often or will they get bored of it after 5 minutes?
  • Age-appropriateness – look for toys specifically designed for you toddler’s age. There aren’t any benefits in buying your little one a toy beyond their years and it may even be dangerous

Here are some ideas for what toys are appropriate for the different stages of your toddler’s development.

12-24 Months:

  • Ride-on toys
  • Simple puzzles or books with large pictures
  • Stacking blocks or cups
  • Movable toys, such as large balls or cars
  • Soft toys, e.g. teddy bears and dolls
  • Simple picture books

24-36 Months:

  • House-hold items, such as a plastic mixing bowl and spoon, which they can use to mimic what you’re doing
  • Large non-toxic crayons with plenty of paper for drawing
  • Hand and finger puppets
  • Blocks
  • Buckets and spades
  • Picture books with stories or rhymes.

36+ Months:

  • Cubbyhouses
  • Tricycles with helmet
  • Paddling pool (always under supervision)
  • Play dough
  • Non-toxic paints with lots of paper for painting
  • Puzzles
  • Picture books with stories or rhymes.

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